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How Much do Home Health Aides Make in Your State?

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It is important to know how much a Home Health Aide makes in your area before deciding to pursue an HHA career. In most industries salary can vary greatly from State to State and Home Health Care is no different.

As with most careers, a Home Health Aide’s salary can vary greatly based on geography.  In States that have traditionally higher costs of living it is likely that the HHA salaries will be higher than in States that typically have lower living costs.  Beyond that, salaries can also be quite different within a particular State depending on urban or rural areas. Before you embark on a new career it is important to have realistic salary expectations, this State by State list will shed some light on how much Home Health Aides make and help you determine if its the right career choice for you.home health aide salary

The following list was compiled using the most recent data from the United States Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (www.bls.gov).

Home Health Aide Salary Ranked by State

The salary numbers you will see on this list are from reports published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in May of 2011 so current numbers may vary slightly, but we think this gives a fair representation of where HHA’s are consistently paid higher salaries.

#1 - Connecticut  $  28,500
#2 - Alaska  $  27,850
#3 - Vermont  $  27,090
#4 - Massachusetts  $  26,750
#5 - Rhode Island  $  26,450
#6 - North Dakota  $  25,990
#7 - Wyoming  $  25,520
#8 - Delaware  $  24,250
#9 - District of Columbia  $  24,160
#10 - Nevada  $  24,080
#11 - South Dakota  $  24,050
#12 - Nebraska  $  23,910
#13 - New Hampshire  $  23,850
#14 - Hawaii  $  23,720
#15 - Maryland  $  23,530
#16 - California  $  23,410
#17 - Washington  $  23,300
#18 - Iowa  $  23,120
#19 - Illinois  $  23,010
#20 - New York  $  22,980
#21 - Minnesota  $  22,920
#22 - New Jersey  $  22,730
#23 - Kentucky  $  22,390
#24 - Colorado  $  22,380
#25 - Oregon  $  22,290
#26 - Maine  $  22,250
#27 - Florida  $  21,870
#28 - Arizona  $  21,820
#29 - Wisconsin  $  21,780
#30 - Michigan  $  21,730
#31 - Pennsylvania  $  21,540
#32 - Utah  $  21,190
#33 - Oklahoma  $  21,150
#34 - Indiana  $  21,140
#35 - Kansas  $  21,000
#36 - Montana  $  20,620
#37 - South Carolina  $  20,370
#38 - Ohio  $  20,360
#39 - New Mexico  $  20,110
#40 - Tennessee  $  20,010
#41 - Georgia  $  19,970
#42 - Texas  $  19,920
#43 - Missouri  $  19,780
#44 - Louisiana  $  19,720
#45 - Virginia  $  19,680
#46 - Idaho  $  19,640
#47 - North Carolina  $  19,610
#48 - Alabama  $  18,910
#49 - Arkansas  $  18,270
#50 - Mississippi  $  18,130
#51 - West Virginia  $  17,990


You might have noticed that the States at the bottom of the list are likely the States that you would expect to see there in that they are all on the low end of the cost of living arc.  However, if you look at the top of the list you will see a few unlikely States that offer very nice wages for this entry level career.  In particular States like Alaska, Wyoming, and North Dakota seem to have very high numbers compared to the relative cost of living.  The primary reason for this is simple; supply and demand.  There just aren’t enough Certified Home Health Aides in these areas to meet the needs of the aging populations.  To drill down deeper into some of these high demand areas in the U.S., take a look at this article on the top 10 metropolitan areas with the highest Home Health Aide Salary Annually.

 

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